Just in Time for Valentine’s Day: Illustrators Join Forces to Teach Us “How to Woo”

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A group of popular illustrators from around the globe have come together in the name of love . . . that is, their love for illustration and the art of modern storytelling. Together, these talented artists have created How to Woo, a special digital handbook featuring the “dos and don’ts of the art of courtship.”  Based on creative interpretations of various romantic (and humorous) gestures such as writing a love letter, getting over a broken heart and how to cry, How to Woo is debuting in the App Store just in time for Valentine’s Day.

“Write a love letter” by Michael Arnold and  “Tattoo the name of your soul mate” by Liran Raviv

Throughout the issue, readers can engage in the many interactive features that showcase the creativity of the artists as well as the inventive way they utilize the tools of Mag+, the publishing ecosystem used to create Scrawl. Scrawl Magazine was created to serve as a platform for artists, giving them the opportunity to create and share their work with others.

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“You can’t go wrong with flowers” by Jessica HJ. Lee and  “Keep your house vermin free for your loved one” by Aart-Jan Venema

“We are excited to bring How to Woo to the App Store in time for Valentine’s Day,” said Michael Golan, designer and co-founder of Scrawl Magazine.  “Valentine’s Day is not just about sweet chocolates and pretty roses, it is also about love letters that were lost in the mail, awkward dates and much more. Our 7th issue is an ode to these sweet and sour sentiments, in the form of a mock ‘’helpful’’ handbook .”

“How to Woo is a fantastic representation of how a graphic novel can make use of the unique features of iPads and other iOS devices to create excellent experiences for readers,” said Mike Haney, Chief Creative Officer of Mag+.  “By using all of the features of the Mag+ platform, these artists can really take interactivity to the next level. The digital features help tell their story in a way that you could never see in a printed magazine.”