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Logolounge the 2011 report

Gradients

Not every trick in the designer’s palette has to be over the top: Subtlety can certainly play a role in the ongoing battle to capture the eye of the consumer. In a number of logo designs, a gentle linear gradation is taking hold–just a modest tweak to a flat, single-color solution. The color gradation may be no more than a 10% shift of color value, or it may be more dramatic, like Chermayeff & Geismar's Women’s Tennis Association logo, which veers from a magenta to a deep violet.

This direction allows designers to create a solution that visually conveys a message of motion or change in coloration but not through the vector shape or image. This is a continuation of trends identified over the last two years that have seen designers being more likely than ever to use the surface of a mark as an opportunity to introduce an additional statement.

From a technical perspective, this presents a formula and reproduction challenge that must be monitored. Simple linear gradations are notorious for shifting between platforms and file types. If monitored with vigilance, though, the rewards will exceed the grief.

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