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anaglyphs

Never have two colors carried such a universal set of directions. An offset red and cyan overprint sends the public scrambling for a set of old-school 3-D glasses. This technique was originally developed by a Frenchman to create dimensional stereoscopic imagery in the 1850s. Today, modern iterations of this effect overprint divergent imagery and make one or the other visible depending on the color of lens selected for viewing.

The messages from these marks creates a dichotomy of choice. They are obvious enough that certainly no special glasses are required to grasp the intent. This technique tells the viewer they may make the choice of this or that but not both. But they also convey that the viewer is responsible for her own selection. Because this is a novel and interactive technique, it commands a response which ensures a few additional milliseconds of attention while the consumer deciphers her options.

anaglyphs

Con Kennedy Visual Communications,
Dublin Institute of Technology

anaglyphs

Wendy K Johnson Design,
Until Lambs Become Lions

anaglyphs

Bitencourt, Alessio Mosca

anaglyphs

sparc, inc., Herman Miller

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